8 B2B Facebook Landing Pages

B2B marketers see the growing numbers of Facebook users and join the ranks of businesses who set up outposts on the world’s largest social network. As Facebook is a tightly controlled environment, there are few opportunities for branding and creating a branded experience for your customers and prospects. The prime one is the creation of custom tabs, and especially landing pages that people see when they first arrive at your Facebook Page.

These Pages are now fully functional web pages hosted within the Facebook environment. This gives B2B companies more flexibility in design and functionality for these landing pages. One of the things marketers need to consider in creating a landing page is what action the visitor needs to take. The first should be to Like the Page, and many landing pages remind viewers to do that. After that, anything is possible, but there should be actions that keep them on the Facebook Page, rather than immediately driving them somewhere else.

Below are 8 examples of B2B company Facebook landing page tabs with a short list of features of each.

Buddy Media


Buddy Media
Like Call to Action: No
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: 2 download white paper buttons
Video: No
Social Profile Links: No
Other Notable: Embedded Facebook comments and poll

Dell Enterprise


Dell Enterprise
Like Call to Action: No
Other Facebook Call to Action: Event Calendar
Off Site Call to Action: 8 solution links and 1 download white paper button
Video: No
Social Profile Links: Yes
Other Notable: n/a

eMarketer


eMarketer
Like Call to Action: Yes
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: 1 product link
Video: No
Social Profile Links: No
Other Notable: Customer testimonials. Note this is an About tab, and is not set to load as a landing page.

EMC


EMC
Like Call to Action: No
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: 1 award submission button
Video: No
Social Profile Links: No
Other Notable: Temporary landing page for award submission

Google AdSense


Google AdSense
Like Call to Action: No
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: 1 sign-up button
Video: Yes
Social Profile Links: No
Other Notable: Sparse look, like Google brand.

Intel


Intel
Like Call to Action: Yes
Other Facebook Call to Action: Interactive map, products, jobs and deals drive to other Facebook Pages or apps within this Page
Off Site Call to Action: No
Video: Yes
Social Profile Links: Yes
Other Notable: Embedded Twitter feed

SAP


SAP
Like Call to Action: Yes
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: Conference registration, product page and YouTube channel buttons
Video: Yes
Social Profile Links: No
Other Notable: n/a

SAS Publishing


SAS Publishing
Like Call to Action: Yes
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: Links to store, blog, podcast, community, forum and Twitter
Video: No
Social Profile Links: Yes
Other Notable: Sets expectations for Page, shows people who manage social profiles

Are there other B2B Facebook landing pages you have seen that are effective at generating engagement and driving traffic? Let us know in the comments below.

SAS Launches Social Media Analytics for Enterprise Customers

Yesterday, SAS, the leader in business analytics, launched an enterprise social media analytics tool. This is a sign the large companies are ready for social media. The very fact that SAS has deemed social media important enough to dedicate resources to building, launching and supporting this new program is one more thing you can hold up as an example of the corporate acceptance of listening and responding to your customers online.

This new product, which is offered as a hosted solution, features a robust analytics engine that can properly code online sentiment at the same level as human analysts, with greater than 90% accuracy, according to online measurement expert, Katie Payne. SAS is used to crunching large amounts of data and social media easily provides large amounts of data. One of the differentiators of the SAS Social Media Analytics product involves the initial software setup. While most social media tools may go back a few months at the most, the new SAS tool captures data that goes back for up to seven years on the various sites related to your industry. Even though there may not be much relevancy beyond the last two years, the capability is there for more.


All analytics products help you answer business questions and determine how you are meeting your business goals. The custom set up of the program involves creating appropriate keywords, finding the right sites and influencers to gather the data important to your company. After you review this first set of data, this becomes the baseline, but not in the traditional way. As you continue to use the software, you have the ability to refine the rules for capturing data and filtering out the noise. While all the original data remains intact for trending purposes, you can re-process it against the more refined filters and re-analyze it. You might discover trends that you originally missed.

The program allows you to forecast both social media sentiment and resources needed to respond, based on past data. You can also measure the effectiveness of professional media, as compared to consumer-generated media, import customer emails to look for customer support trends that are mirrored on the web, and find industry influencers to reach out to. And all this data, along with corresponding individuals, customers and prospects can be shared with your CRM system for fully integrated tracking and management.

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SAS SVP and CMO Jim Davis

Here are links to the official SAS information:

Other coverage included:

After watching the demo and reading some of the links below, does this change the landscape of social media analytics and push other social media analytics programs to up their game, or is SAS playing in a different market?

Social Media Best Practices from SAS, Part 2

Recently, we had the chance to sit down with David Thomas, Social Media Manager with SAS, the business analytics and business intelligence software company, and talk about social media in a B2B environment. This is part two of our interview. Here is a link to part one.

He talked about handling multiple requests for social media information, sharing best practices among employees who don’t normally communicate externally, and the importance of social media guidelines. He made an important point for people who are reluctant to dive into social media. If you can trust your employees to interact with customers at trade shows, by telephone and email, it is easy to trust them to communicate using social media tools. And even if you don’t think your customers are using social media, you need to monitor these channels for mentions about your industry so you can be prepared when they do start using it.

Here is a link to the presentation David mentioned by Charlene Li entitled Convince the Curmudgeon.

To learn more about David and social media at SAS, read his blog at blogs.sas.com/socialmedia and follow him on Twitter @DavidBThomas

Social Media Best Practices from SAS, Part 1

Recently, we had the chance to sit down with David Thomas, Social Media Manager with SAS, the business analytics and business intelligence software company, and talk about social media in a B2B environment.

He talked about bringing people together from various parts of the company and developing a social media plan that touches everything SAS does. He mentioned six areas of focus that they built out as their approach to social media: social networks, blogs, podcasting, video, wikipedia and content syndication. And on top of everything else, the company must provide good content. The deliberate and inclusive process that David described is a good model to follow and best practice for other companies to implement as they are starting social media endeavors.

Since the conversation was rather lengthy, we split it into two parts. This is part one of the interview, and we will post the part two next week. This is a great chance to subscribe to this site by clicking on the orange RSS button in the upper right so you can view part two as soon as it is posted.

To learn more about David and social media at SAS, read his blog at blogs.sas.com/socialmedia and follow him on Twitter @DavidBThomas