5 Ways to Use Your LinkedIn Profile to Attract Inbound B2B Leads

b2b-LinkedIn-LogoMy friend Tom Skotidas and I are at it again and this time we talked about how anyone, but especially B2B sales pros, can use their LinkedIn profile to attract inbound leads. Tom calls this inbound social selling. He is the founder of Skotidas, Asia Pacific’s leader in B2B Social Media Lead Generation. We have been talking about the intersection of sales and content marketing for B2B companies. A lot of people call this social selling, but there is more to it than just that.

1. Re-Think the Purpose of Your Profile

Rather than just create a profile that shows your job history and qualifications, create a profile that shows how you can solve your target audience’s problems and serve their needs. Think of your profile as a piece content that reflects your company’s capabilities, rather than your resume.

2. Use the Right Keywords

Throughout your LinkedIn profile you should use keywords that are related to your products and services. Not just any keywords, but ones that your prospects commonly use. One way to determine those keywords is by using Google’s Keyword Ad Planner Tool. It is designed to help determine keywords for Google ads, so you need an AdWords account (connected to a regular Google account), but you don’t need to place any ads to use the tool.

3. View Your LinkedIn Profile as a Web Page to be Indexed

As you are re-thinking about your LinkedIn profile and using the appropriate keywords, remember that this is a web page that is indexed by Google and other search engines. LinkedIn is a high-ranking domain and can show up as a top result in searches for your keywords.

4. Don’t Forget About LinkedIn Search

Active LinkedIn users use the search functions within LinkedIn to find what they are looking for, beyond people’s names and companies.

5. Optimize These 9 Fields in Your LinkedIn Profile

Once you have your keywords to attract your prospects, what do you do with them? There are several fields in your LinkedIn profile that Tom identified as the most relevant.

  • Headline: The default is your current job at your current company. This is the most important thing to change to appeal to prospects.
  • Contact Information: This should include the best ways to contact you, plus a website or landing page that includes information to your target prospects
  • Summary: This is where you can really speak to the prospect about how you and your company can solve their business problems, using a good selection of keywords.
  • Experience: What you do in your job is another opportunity to tell the story of your success helping customers solve problems.
  • Marketing Assets: Work with your marketing team to get Powerpoints and PDFs to add to your LinkedIn profile and use your keywords in the title of the pieces.
  • Skills & Endorsements: Have others endorse you for skills that are most relevant to your target prospects. You have the ability to edit your list of skils.
  • Publications: Relevant blog posts, ebooks or articles quoting you can be listed here. If you don’t have any, this is a good time see if you can collaborate with someone to create some things to list.
  • Recommendations: Ask your customers for recommendations. They will use the terms that others in your industry use, and they will also validate your position as someone who is helpful.
  • Groups Joined: The Groups you join show on your profile, so make sure you join relevant Groups with names that look and sound good.

What have you done on your LinkedIn profile to attract B2B prospects?

Work in B2B? LinkedIn Can Supercharge Your Personal Brand

b2b-LinkedIn-LogoEmployees at B2B companies know that LinkedIn is the B2B network. It can meet a host of individual and business objectives such as increasing awareness, enhancing SEO, driving website traffic, dripping on prospects and lead generation.

In 2004, when I was running digital marketing for a financial services company, one of my project managers told me he had joined LinkedIn. I asked him what it was. His answer? It’s kind of a digital rolodex that connects people. I didn’t really get it at the time but since I was the guy in charge, and supposed to be leading the digital efforts, how could I not join?

Well, a decade later, I am a believer. LinkedIn is more like a rolodex on steroids and then some.

I’ve used it for all of the things mentioned above, but today I’ll focus on a couple of my favorite tips which helped me become one of LinkedIn’s top 1% most viewed profiles and will help you to supercharge your personal brand.

Start Them Up With Your Summary

Your summary is the first piece of content your profile visitors will see. It’s where you can clearly differentiate yourself from others in your field. What you do in your profession are table stakes. For example, a financial advisor will typically help clients save for retirement, or create financial plans to increase wealth. If every advisor in town does the same thing, how does one rise above the rest? That’s where the summary comes in.

Think of your summary as the place to tell your story. Not in a static resume kind of way, as that’s what the rest of your profile is for, but in a more dynamic and engaging manner. Start by considering simple questions beyond who you are and what you do. What do you stand for? What have you done that’s cool, fun or different? How can you showcase your personality? And why would someone care? Consider what you write as the value proposition of your personal brand. Your value prop separates you from everyone else, so use that to pique your profile visitor’s interest and generate immediate interest in you.

Before you finalize it, consider your keywords. That’s right. Not unlike your website, consider the keywords you want people to find you with – not only via LinkedIn searches, but web searches. Search engines pay attention to LinkedIn profiles and using them as indicators of relevance so choose those keywords carefully and you’ll enhance both your search engine optimization (SEO) and your awareness generation efforts.

Stay Top of Mind with Status Updates

Businesspeople are starting to use the status update feature but there is plenty of room for more. In fact, LinkedIn is allowing people like you and me the opportunity to blog on LinkedIn as another form of status updates.

Status updates appear on the home page of your connections and group members. They can be shared, liked and commented on which will expand your reach even further. Your updates will get noticed if you post enough relevant and engaging content.

To be successful, begin with a content strategy. Decide what you want to post based on your value proposition and what you want to be known for. You can post original content, share other content, curate content – there are a lot of ways to do it, just choose what’s best for you.

I’m a content curator. I research content every day to source content that my network and prospects will find interesting. I schedule my posts a day in advance using HootSuite, and post every two hours starting at 7:00 am. I chose this schedule based on research I did about when my prospects are online and engaging with content. Though I may not get as many views and shares as Jeff Weiner or Richard Branson, I know my content is seen, as I’ll have people stop me in the supermarket asking to chat about something I shared.

Increase awareness, stay relevant, and support your brand with status updates.

What else have you done to supercharge your personal brand on LinkedIn?

Increase B2B Traffic and Reach with a LinkedIn Blog

b2b-LinkedIn-LogoLinkedIn has long been the place where B2B marketers could build a professional network, create an online resume and share compelling content with that network. As part of LinkedIn’s content marketing push, they launched the Influencer program to bring top quality content from thought leaders across multiple industries into the platform. And they picked who could participate. And they worked with editors.

Now that this program is well established, LinkedIn is opening their platform up to all members. This doesn’t mean you and I can become part of the Influencer program. It doesn’t mean that you will instantly become a thought leader. It does mean that you can now blog on the LinkedIn platform and have it associated with your profile. Following will now become part of the regular vocabulary on LinkedIn. Someone can follow your posts without asking your permission to connect.

Create a Plan to Drive Traffic

Now matter how starry-eyed you become about the potential, and I mean potential and not real, reach of these blog posts, you should create a plan that still drives readers back to a site you own, like a company blog or web site. LinkedIn is still a platform that you cannot control. As they roll out this platform, things will change.

Write Unique Content

Your plan needs to focus on great content. If you really want to make an impact on LinkedIn look at the popular Influencer articles and see what resonates with professionals. There are no cat videos or list-based articles. It’s a look of good, solid advice that appeals to a general audience, but with a focus on careers, business growth, technology and entrepreneurship. Don’t syndicate your content between your blog and LinkedIn. Create unique posts for LinkedIn and offer more on your own blog. If your LinkedIn posts are general, your content on your blog can be a bit more specific and focused on your prospects.

Include Calls-to-Action

Have you seen what many of the influencers do on their posts? Subscribe to my blog. Follow me on Twitter. Sign up for my newsletter. While this overload of actions can cause readers to do nothing, the idea is still sound. Blog posts need calls-to-action. A connection to stay informed about future posts or activities is fine. Connecting them to another post you have published is great. Driving them to a landing page to download additional content works too. View these posts as above the top of your funnel and think how can you convert them with content and identify those who are prospects.

Use the Platform to Grow Your Reach

Posts will show up on your personal profile, so make sure you share them on the company page and within any active groups. Ask your colleagues, partners and customers to share these posts on their LinkedIn profiles (and other social channels) to get more reach on LinkedIn. There may be a most popular posts, like the Influencers have, so it will be beneficial to get lots of views on your posts. And don’t forget that you can tag people in updates that include a link to the post to make them aware of it, but don’t go overboard. You can also follow others and they may see you followed them. Until this is fully rolled out, we don’t know the complete functionality.

Share Your Unique Posts on Other Platforms

Each LinkedIn post has its own URL, which means you can share these posts on Twitter, Facebook and any other platforms where your prospects spend their time. You can even include them in an email newsletter to drive more traffic to them.

What are you thinking about the new blogging platform embedded in LinkedIn? Are you working on that plan yet?

4 Ways LinkedIn is All-In for B2B Content Marketing

b2b-LinkedIn-LogoLinkedIn has always been the professional social network and the most effective network for B2B marketers. The mission of LinkedIn is to connect the world’s professionals and make them more productive. As they focus more on content marketing, there are strong parallels, as the right content can also make users more productive.

The context of LinkedIn is professional. This is important to understand as LinkedIn is a customer first company. Even though customers go to Facebook at night, the next morning they come back to LinkedIn with their professional hat on. They are aspirational as they think about their career and other professional goals. They are investing time in the platform, rather than spending time.

Marketers need to put their prospects and customers first when it comes to content.

Here are the four ways that LinkedIn is all in for B2B Content Marketing:

1. LinkedIn Today

LinkedIn Today promotes content from the web that is shared using the LinkedIn Share button. The most popular content is surfaced to LinkedIn members, and shown to their based on their industry, interests and self-selected categories.

2. Influencers

LinkedIn selected 150 influencers to launch this program by offering the opportunity to post long form content about any topics, or blog, on LinkedIn. The only guidelines LinkedIn provided were that members are interested in content that informs, educates and inspires. These posts generated rich, deep comments from real thought leaders. The program has expanded to 400 people since its launch last year.

3. Slideshare

The acquisition of the world’s largest collection of business presentations really brought the idea of visual content to LinkedIn. There was always a strong connection between two platforms, as they both focused on the business side of things, but by using the Slideshare technology, LinkedIn has created more opportunities to post richer, visual content on profiles and company pages.

4. Sponsored Updates

LinkedIn took their time developing an in-stream, native ad product because of their customer first focus. These updates appear across mobile, tablet and desktop versions of the site. One example of a company that has achieved success with these updates was marketing technology company and power content creator, Hubspot. They got 400% more leads from their sponsored updates than any other source.

Change the marketers mantra from always be selling to always be helping

The key ingredient to better content experience is relevance and as marketers move from information to insights they can create more relevant content. Three ways to create more relevant content in real time:

  • Waiting for the Moment:
  • In the Moment:
  • Anticipating the Moment:

What is LinkedIn doing to help marketers make sure they have relevance content?

  • Highlight content types
  • Quantify content influence
  • Provide recommendations

How have the changes to LinkedIn and their approach to content marketing affected your B2B marketing on the platform? Have these new opportunities driven more traffics and leads to your own content?

How To Find the Best B2B Social Media Linkedin Groups

Most people learn how to use Linkedin by building a network of professional connections. Some even take the time to post updates to their activity feed. But if you haven’t noticed yet, not a lot of people hang out in the activity stream on Linkedin.

The lion’s share of real engagement happens in Linkedin Groups, especially for B2B companies. But not all Linkedin Groups. Most are veritable spam fests where unscrupulous marketers spam links to promotions or try to drive clicks to their blog posts.

So how do you find the really good Linkedin Groups? How can you tell which ones are worthwhile, and which ones are worthless?

You could just join a bunch of groups, follow the activity that occurs in each one and learn that way. But that’s time consuming. And since there are nearly 1.6 million Linkedin Groups and you can only join 50 at a time, finding the genuinely worthwhile groups that way could take a lifetime.

As an example, I used Linkedin Group statistics to analyze the three B2B social media groups I’ve been a member of to see which one is the best.

I’d rather spend more time in one Linkedin Group where I can have real discussions with other professionals who are interested in exploring a common topic, then spread myself thin over a bunch of groups, particularly if some of them are spammy.

Here’s how to use Linkedin Group Statistics to see which ones to join.

1. Review the Group

Go to the Linkedin Group you’re considering joining. But don’t join right away.

Instead, scroll down below the “Top Influencers of the Week” box in the right-hand column and find “Group Statistics.” The “3,759” number you see in the image is not accurate. Every group uses the same generic artwork. So ignore it and click “View Group Statistics.”

2. Review the Activity

Once you’re in the Linkedin Group Statistics page, click the “Activity” tab and check out the graph on the right. “Discussions” are new posts left to the Group and “comments” made underneath new discussions. A better way to think about “discussions” is as “new posts,” because if no one comments, they aren’t actually discussions.

3. Compare Discussions to Comments

The chart will give you a snapshot of whether or not people are having conversations. If the number of discussions is much higher than the number of comments, people are leaving new posts, but they’re not starting conversations. Unfortunately, this is the case most of the time in Linkedin Groups.

Now and again, as in the Linkedin Group used in the example above appears currently to be hosting healthy conversations, but not until recently. In fact, comments surpassed discussions just last month. Could it be a fluke?

4. Look at the Conversations

Let’s check it out and see. Just because there’s a healthy conversation going on, doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a worthwhile group. A low ratio of discussions to comments is necessary, but not sufficient. So hop on over to the group’s activity feed and see if the discussions are interesting to you. If they are, join up.

As a rule of thumb, closed groups tend to be less spammy than open groups because they are actively monitored by a community manager. Some Linkedin Groups have rules for what they do and don’t allow. If they have rules, the manger will send them to you if your membership is approved.

So which B2B Linkedin Groups are the healthiest?

I compared the following Linkedin Groups:

Here’s what I found:

With more than 200 discussions posted in recent months, both B2B Online Marketing and BtoB Marketing do have more activity. But that’s not an indication of worthwhile conversation because they both have too few comments. There’s almost no conversation occurring there at all in these group, and since conversation is engagement, these are, you guessed it, spam fests.

B2B Social Media, on the other hand, has around half the volume of new discussions being posted, but those discussions most recently have started drawing a healthy number of comments. As of January, the engagement level has picked up sharply. For readers of this site, if you like what you see in the Group’s activity stream, this is the one to join.

Are there other ways you have evaluated LinkedIn Groups, or are there other B2B social media or marketing groups that provided value? Let other readers know in the comments below.

Use Social Media Statistics to Find Your B2B Audience

B2B marketers often use statistics for their social media presentations. Whether these are educational decks for internal or external audiences, or slides to prove the need for an investment in social media, this is a very limited use for all the statistics that are available online. Why not use these stats to understand more about our target audiences and gain some insight into their online behaviors. The Pew Internet and American Life Project has conducted an ongoing series of surveys about social media adoption of US internet users. The latest version of the survey was just released, so let’s look at some other ways to use this survey.

We have a tendency to focus only on B2B related surveys, but a general audience survey can be helpful in providing guidance and discovering your audience on social media channels. To paraphrase a line from the funny Tim Washer, all B2B prospects and customers are people, so their general internet usage is something to consider.

Let’s look at some of the survey results with a bit of thought around each stat and how it applies to a B2B audience.

67% of US Internet users use social networking sites

That’s two-thirds of all internet users, so when someone says that your prospects and customers are not on social networks, they are wrong. They probably are. This doesn’t necessarily mean they are looking for business-related information on social networks, but if you can connect with them and provide value (through content), you can build and nurture these relationships.

71% of women surveyed use social networking sites

If your target personas are women, or even skew more towards woman, take another look at how you are using social media to drive lead generation. Women are more likely to use social networking sites than men, so a better understanding of how they use it and the kinds of content that appeals to women will attract more prospects. I don’t mean make all your ebooks pink, but think about the differences in the way women and men solve problems, gather information and share information on social networks when developing your content strategy.

83% of 18-29 year olds use social networking

We all know that a greater percentage of younger people use social networking sites than older people, but the next age group of 30-49 is still at 77% usage. It slides all the way down to 32% when you get over 65. If your goal is to reach older executives on social networking sites, that will be a challenge. They are just not there yet. But as prospects are researching online for business solutions, social networking can play a part for anyone. If an intern or a junior employee is the one who seeks out information about your products, or fills out lead forms, what kinds of things are they searching for? These would be less technical results than what an engineer would look for.

16% of US Internet users use Twitter

With the overemphasis on Twitter in marketing and media, it is hard to accept that only 16% of US internet users are on Twitter. And the demographic data shows that is skews younger and more urban, so that does not necessarily provide much guidance for finding and reaching a B2B audience. Many B2B companies start with Twitter because they think it is easy to tweet, but they quickly run out of things to tweet without a plan. Twitter’s best use is to help amplify your own short and long-form content. It is also worthwhile to ask your customers if they are using Twitter, and what value they get from it. This can help guide you in connecting with prospects on the social network.

20% of US Internet users use LinkedIn

While the study mentioned above did not report LinkedIn usage, a previous Pew study did. And I can’t write a B2B article without talking about LinkedIn. This is a surprising result in certain business circles. It seems that every business person is on LinkedIn. Executives from all Fortune 500 companies are on LinkedIn. But with usage at only 20%, there are certainly B2B prospects are not on it. Use this information to dig more into your customers’ behavior to understand how to maximize your LinkedIn efforts.

67% of US Internet users use Facebook

The percentage of Facebook users matches the overall social networking usage numbers. While it is not an exact one for one match, you can interpret this to mean that your audience is on Facebook. It is possible to use Facebook grow your audience, build connections and drive leads, but it requires content creation, compelling images and sponsored posts to increase the reach of those posts. It is work, and it takes times, but you can get results from Facebook.

How else would you look at these statistics to find your B2B audience on social media sites?

Photo credit: Flickr

20 LinkedIn Tips for B2B Social Media Success

B2B marketers are looking for ways to improve their social media marketing results, and one of the platforms that helps with that is LinkedIn. Many B2B companies have seen success on the professional social network by getting employees to represent the company in addition to their own experiences, managing company pages and even running industry groups.

Below are 20 tips that will help with many aspects of LinkedIn, both personal and for your company. Each one of the tips has a link to the original source, so many more tips can be found by clicking through and reading more. If you have other great tips for B2B companies, please share them in the comments below.

Personal Profiles

1. Use a professional-looking photo that is tight and well-lit with limited background distractions. (Source)

2. Customize your website listings. (Source)

3. Use LinkedIn to follow up after other communications. (Source)

4. Teach LinkedIn strategy and tactics to your employees. (Source)

5. Endorse others first and endorse fairly. (Source)

Company Pages

6. Choose keywords in your company description that your potential customers might look for. (Source)

7. Target your posts by Industry or Location. (Source)

8. Build followers for your LinkedIn company page. (Source)

9. Amplify through your network. (Source)

10. Monitor and focus your efforts. (Source)

Networking

11. Use “Tags” to categorize your connections. (Source)

12. When you think it could benefit your business, ask your contacts for introductions to their contacts. (Source)

13. Understand the psychological needs of people on LinkedIn when connecting with them. (Source)

Groups

14. Have sales reps join industry and local LinkedIn Groups. (Source)

15. The best groups have discussion topics that do not always begin with blog article links. (Source)

16. Send messages to a large number of people for free. (Source)

Lead Generation

17. Target searches for keywords you’ve identified as central to your business. (Source)

18. Create free banners on your products/services page. (Source)

LinkedIn Advertising

19. Each element must attract the audience you’re targeting and inspire people to click on the ad. (Source)

20. Create a special landing page just for LinkedIn ads. (Source)

What are some things you have done to grow your B2B network or expand your company’s presence on LinkedIn?

Facebook and Pinterest Lead Top B2B Social Media Posts in 2012

It is halfway through 2012 and it is always interesting to see what B2B social media posts generated the most interest from our readers. This list was compiled based on page views in Google Analytics.

It is no real surprise that the top posts relate to Facebook’s Timeline, current statistics, Pinterest, LinkedIn, generating leads and measurement. These are things that are most on B2B marketers’ minds. It is also notable that 9 of the 10 posts feature a number in the headline. In both of these cases, content and numbered headlines, this may be more about what we write about and how we structure posts, than about popularity of certain kinds of posts.

If you missed any of these posts, this is a great chance to read them and share them. Are there any other posts that resonated with you that would be in your top ten? Let us know in the comments below.

1. 10 of the Best B2B Facebook Timeline Cover Photos

2. 12 Revealing Stats About B2B Social Media Marketing

3. 5 Ways B2B Companies Can Use Facebook Timeline

4. 4 Reasons For B2B Marketers To Explore Pinterest

5. 5 Ridiculous B2B Social Media Marketing Myths

6. 4 Ways to Use Storytelling for B2B Social Media

7. 5 Ways to Generate Leads from a LinkedIn B2B Company Page

8. 12 Compelling B2B Social Media Slideshare Presentations

9. Generate More Leads with B2B Social Media [Infographic]

10. 5 Ways to Measure Results of B2B Social Media

Photo: Flickr

B2B Companies Can Target LinkedIn Updates

LinkedIn now lets companies target their status updates by a variety of factors. One of the tactics I mentioned in a post about B2B companies generating leads on LinkedIn was to use status updates to share content with your LinkedIn followers. If you have various lines of business, you can now focus those updates to the right people. If you have content created for certain industries, functions or seniority, LinkedIn updates can be directed to those who are in those segments. And remember, only company page admins can post company status updates.

The first thing to note is that if you want to start segmenting your updates, you need to grow your LinkedIn followers. Some easy ways are to cross-promote on your other social channels, add a follow company button on your website or blog, and you can even write a blog post that you are segmenting LinkedIn status updates for improved relevancy.

When posting a status update, the default is to send it to all followers. Click the drop down to change to targeted audience, which brings up the targeted window seen below.

Company Size

In the targeted window, notice you can remove employees from your company updates in the lower right (indicated by the red arrow). While there may be good reasons to do this, sharing updates with your employees give them content to share with their own networks on LinkedIn.

Each of the five segmenting characteristics has their own tab to make your choices. As you click your selections, LinkedIn will show you how many followers this update will go to. As you work your way through the segments, this number will go down, but it will be more relevant to the people who see it.

Industry

Do you have a message for a particular industry? Are your salespeople aligned by verticals? Use these targeted industry selections to support their work in the verticals. Create a vertically focused ebook and share it this way. This can help you better understand your vertical audiences on LinkedIn.

Function

Do different functions in an organization use your product or service differently? Do they have a different evaluation process for purchase? Can you clearly communicate that message? If so, you can talk to them differently now on LinkedIn too.

Seniority

We have different conversations with managers, directors, VP and C-suite executives. Do you know where they are in your decision process? Do you know what ideas, benefits, metrics have convinced them of your value. What does an ebook for a CMO look like? Share it on LinkedIn with just those C-levels.

Geography

This segmentation can can very granular, down to the metro region within states. Unless you have a local product or service, be careful about targeting this one too tightly. You are probably better off staying broader with regions like North America or Europe, or even countries.

Does this kind of targeting and segmentation make sense for your B2B company on LinkedIn?

5 Ways to Generate Leads from a LinkedIn B2B Company Page

Many B2B companies have been successful at generating leads from LinkedIn, but there are features of a company page that B2B marketers are just not aware of. Most B2B companies have company pages on LinkedIn where they include a keyword-stuffed paragraph or two of marketing-speak. It also shows the employees who work at the company. This is the most basic option for LinkedIn.

1. Products and Services

The first thing that you need to do is enable the Products and Services function of the company page and begin adding products and services. This is where the action happens on the company page. Recommendations aren’t given for companies. They are given for products. Several of the follow lead generating suggestions are based on areas in the product and services tab. Note that you can be flexible with the definition of what a product is. If you have a compelling ebook that is appropriate for a LinkedIn audience, add that as a product. You can direct visitors to a download page with a lead form to receive the ebook.

2. Free Banners

Want to test some new creative ideas? Want to test some landing pages? LinkedIn gives you three free banner ads at the top of the products and services page. Create images that are 640×220 pixels, upload them to your page and add a unique URL, preferably to a landing page, and you have free ads. All you need to do now is make sure you are directing traffic to your LinkedIn products and services page.

3. Personal Contacts

Prospects don’t always like filling out contact forms because they never know who is going to contact them, but what if you could show them real people, with pictures and everything, that they could connect to for more information. This personalization of contact can be set by product, so consider adding people who have a high enough profile in your business or who have a title that makes sense for the contact. This can be viewed by some prospects as a purely “for more information” request about the product or service, so product managers can be a good fit, but these are leads. Clicking on this link is someone raising their hand and expressing interest.

4. Video with Call to Action

Each product and service entry has a space to link to a YouTube video, which appears embedded on the page. Video is another way to tell the story of your products. There are many ways to include calls-to-action in a YouTube video, which should be considered for the ones on your LinkedIn page. Everything you do on this page should provide enough information for prospects to decide that your products and services should be in the consideration phase of their buying process. You need to make it easy for them to take the next step and become a lead.

5. Status Updates

Companies can share status updates with those following the company. This is different than sharing information on your personal profile. You should have a content plan for sharing on your company profile. Share a mix of third party articles, company blog posts, links to ebooks and webinars, employee information and other content appropriate for your LinkedIn audience. Cross promote LinkedIn groups and events to continue to build your audience across LinkedIn. The main thing to do for lead gen is to make sure you are providing compelling offers with calls-to-action so prospects can become leads for your B2B company.

Have you taken advantage of all the lead gen levers that LinkedIn offers on your B2B company page?