3 B2B Uses of Pinned Tweets on New Twitter Brand Pages

Last week Twitter launched their new interface, which included brand pages with some added features. A limited numbers of partners had access to these brand pages, including B2B companies Dell, General Electric and Intel. One of the interesting features is the ability for companies to pin a tweet to the top of their stream, so it is always showing. Each of these three companies realized this was a perfect place for an embedded video, as Twitter now shows video within tweets. As these pages roll out to others, each approach gives you something to think about when planning your own B2B companies pinned tweet.

Dell featured the new Twitter video, which explains some of the new features. This provides some value to their followers in the form of education. General Electric shared a video showing the variety of products they make, and they used the number 140 to tie it to Twitter. Diversity of products and services is key part of who GE is. And Intel featured a customer unboxing a product. This simple customer shows the important of technology to our lives, and Intel is a part of that. Screenshots of each page are below, as well as each video.

Dell


General Electric


Intel


What do you think of their use of the pinned tweet, and what will you use for your B2B company pinned tweet when this feature is widely available?

8 B2B Facebook Landing Pages

B2B marketers see the growing numbers of Facebook users and join the ranks of businesses who set up outposts on the world’s largest social network. As Facebook is a tightly controlled environment, there are few opportunities for branding and creating a branded experience for your customers and prospects. The prime one is the creation of custom tabs, and especially landing pages that people see when they first arrive at your Facebook Page.

These Pages are now fully functional web pages hosted within the Facebook environment. This gives B2B companies more flexibility in design and functionality for these landing pages. One of the things marketers need to consider in creating a landing page is what action the visitor needs to take. The first should be to Like the Page, and many landing pages remind viewers to do that. After that, anything is possible, but there should be actions that keep them on the Facebook Page, rather than immediately driving them somewhere else.

Below are 8 examples of B2B company Facebook landing page tabs with a short list of features of each.

Buddy Media


Buddy Media
Like Call to Action: No
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: 2 download white paper buttons
Video: No
Social Profile Links: No
Other Notable: Embedded Facebook comments and poll

Dell Enterprise


Dell Enterprise
Like Call to Action: No
Other Facebook Call to Action: Event Calendar
Off Site Call to Action: 8 solution links and 1 download white paper button
Video: No
Social Profile Links: Yes
Other Notable: n/a

eMarketer


eMarketer
Like Call to Action: Yes
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: 1 product link
Video: No
Social Profile Links: No
Other Notable: Customer testimonials. Note this is an About tab, and is not set to load as a landing page.

EMC


EMC
Like Call to Action: No
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: 1 award submission button
Video: No
Social Profile Links: No
Other Notable: Temporary landing page for award submission

Google AdSense


Google AdSense
Like Call to Action: No
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: 1 sign-up button
Video: Yes
Social Profile Links: No
Other Notable: Sparse look, like Google brand.

Intel


Intel
Like Call to Action: Yes
Other Facebook Call to Action: Interactive map, products, jobs and deals drive to other Facebook Pages or apps within this Page
Off Site Call to Action: No
Video: Yes
Social Profile Links: Yes
Other Notable: Embedded Twitter feed

SAP


SAP
Like Call to Action: Yes
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: Conference registration, product page and YouTube channel buttons
Video: Yes
Social Profile Links: No
Other Notable: n/a

SAS Publishing


SAS Publishing
Like Call to Action: Yes
Other Facebook Call to Action: No
Off Site Call to Action: Links to store, blog, podcast, community, forum and Twitter
Video: No
Social Profile Links: Yes
Other Notable: Sets expectations for Page, shows people who manage social profiles

Are there other B2B Facebook landing pages you have seen that are effective at generating engagement and driving traffic? Let us know in the comments below.

Video: Inside B2B Social Media with Intel

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Here’s a short interview with Bryan Rhoads, Senior Digital Strategist for Intel, where he discusses how Intel uses social media in its B2B marketing. This video interview was shot during Social Fresh Portland.

Intel started social media in the B2B space. They transitioned their approach through the following phases of digital adoption: grassroots, pilots, operational and widespread adoption. Online conversations are actually more natural in B2B because of subject matter experts. Now Intel integrates social media in all B2B communications and it helps awareness, community and customer support.

Follow Bryan on Twitter @bryanrhoads.

All B2B Companies Need Social Media Policies

With social media policies in the mainstream news from both the Washington Post and the NBA, this is a good time to look at social media policies as they relate to B2B companies and their communications efforts.

This post is filled with examples from large companies that sell products and services to other companies. These are good models to review as you develop your own social media policies. There is not much difference between social media policies for B2B and B2C companies. In both cases, employees are representing their companies, whether on company-sponsored platforms, on other third party blogs, or on social networking sites. Even in instances where employees are expressing their own views which don’t represent the company’s views, they are still part of the company’s online presence.

The first place to start is with the need for social media policies. No matter the size of company, there needs to be an understanding of how employees can use social media. This can be formal or informal, but without even the most basic guidelines, misunderstandings are sure to occur. Even if you are operating a sole proprietorship, you need a social media policy for how you present yourself to clients and prospects.

With larger companies, these policies are hammered out by committees that frequently include HR and legal, and are shared either on an intranet for internal access, or on public-facing websites for all to see. In the age of transparency, many companies want these policies public, so customers can understand a company’s approach to social media.

A social media policy represents a company’s culture. Sun begins their policy with a very clear statement about the company’s thoughts on social media. “By speaking directly to the world, without prior management approval, we are accepting higher risks in the interest of higher rewards. We don’t want to micro-manage, but here is some advice that we expect you to follow to help you manage that risk.”

Some companies acknowledge that their employees are adults and take a professional approach to representing their company on social media sites that is no different than staffing a booth at a trade show. For example, Cisco reminds employees that “common sense is the best guide if you decide to post information in any way relating to Cisco,” while Headset Bros makes it a little more personal: “Never post anything you would be afraid for your Mom to see.” And finally, Gartner reminds employees to “be personable and have fun. Web participation is about enjoying personal interactions, not delivering corporate communications.”

One of the earliest social media policies was created by IBM in 2005. This policy was created by employees to best determine how to participate in the blogging conversation. IBM continues to update their online, and very public, document as the social web changes and grows. They view this participation as critical to company operation. “IBM is increasingly exploring how online discourse through social computing can empower IBMers as global professionals, innovators and citizens.”

Many companies would like their employees to clearly identify themselves as an employee of the company, however, they must acknowledge that the thoughts and opinions are personal and do not represent the companies views. This is even true on many company blogs.

Your Internet posting should reflect your personal point of view, not necessarily the point of view of Cisco. Because you are legally responsible for your postings, you may be subject to liability if your posts are found defamatory, harassing, or in violation of any other applicable law. When posting your point of view, you should neither claim nor imply you are speaking on Cisco’s behalf, unless you are authorized in writing by your manager to do so.

As transparency continues to be important, Intel wants its employees to acknowledge mistakes. “Did you screw up? If you make a mistake, admit it. Be upfront and be quick with your correction. If you’re posting to a blog, you may choose to modify an earlier post—just make it clear that you have done so.”

Here is a growing list of social media policies, which includes the above B2B examples, as well as examples from other categories. If there are other examples of social media policies that you have used to create yours, let us know in the comments below.