Work in B2B? LinkedIn Can Supercharge Your Personal Brand

b2b-LinkedIn-LogoEmployees at B2B companies know that LinkedIn is the B2B network. It can meet a host of individual and business objectives such as increasing awareness, enhancing SEO, driving website traffic, dripping on prospects and lead generation.

In 2004, when I was running digital marketing for a financial services company, one of my project managers told me he had joined LinkedIn. I asked him what it was. His answer? It’s kind of a digital rolodex that connects people. I didn’t really get it at the time but since I was the guy in charge, and supposed to be leading the digital efforts, how could I not join?

Well, a decade later, I am a believer. LinkedIn is more like a rolodex on steroids and then some.

I’ve used it for all of the things mentioned above, but today I’ll focus on a couple of my favorite tips which helped me become one of LinkedIn’s top 1% most viewed profiles and will help you to supercharge your personal brand.

Start Them Up With Your Summary

Your summary is the first piece of content your profile visitors will see. It’s where you can clearly differentiate yourself from others in your field. What you do in your profession are table stakes. For example, a financial advisor will typically help clients save for retirement, or create financial plans to increase wealth. If every advisor in town does the same thing, how does one rise above the rest? That’s where the summary comes in.

Think of your summary as the place to tell your story. Not in a static resume kind of way, as that’s what the rest of your profile is for, but in a more dynamic and engaging manner. Start by considering simple questions beyond who you are and what you do. What do you stand for? What have you done that’s cool, fun or different? How can you showcase your personality? And why would someone care? Consider what you write as the value proposition of your personal brand. Your value prop separates you from everyone else, so use that to pique your profile visitor’s interest and generate immediate interest in you.

Before you finalize it, consider your keywords. That’s right. Not unlike your website, consider the keywords you want people to find you with – not only via LinkedIn searches, but web searches. Search engines pay attention to LinkedIn profiles and using them as indicators of relevance so choose those keywords carefully and you’ll enhance both your search engine optimization (SEO) and your awareness generation efforts.

Stay Top of Mind with Status Updates

Businesspeople are starting to use the status update feature but there is plenty of room for more. In fact, LinkedIn is allowing people like you and me the opportunity to blog on LinkedIn as another form of status updates.

Status updates appear on the home page of your connections and group members. They can be shared, liked and commented on which will expand your reach even further. Your updates will get noticed if you post enough relevant and engaging content.

To be successful, begin with a content strategy. Decide what you want to post based on your value proposition and what you want to be known for. You can post original content, share other content, curate content – there are a lot of ways to do it, just choose what’s best for you.

I’m a content curator. I research content every day to source content that my network and prospects will find interesting. I schedule my posts a day in advance using HootSuite, and post every two hours starting at 7:00 am. I chose this schedule based on research I did about when my prospects are online and engaging with content. Though I may not get as many views and shares as Jeff Weiner or Richard Branson, I know my content is seen, as I’ll have people stop me in the supermarket asking to chat about something I shared.

Increase awareness, stay relevant, and support your brand with status updates.

What else have you done to supercharge your personal brand on LinkedIn?

Increase B2B Traffic and Reach with a LinkedIn Blog

b2b-LinkedIn-LogoLinkedIn has long been the place where B2B marketers could build a professional network, create an online resume and share compelling content with that network. As part of LinkedIn’s content marketing push, they launched the Influencer program to bring top quality content from thought leaders across multiple industries into the platform. And they picked who could participate. And they worked with editors.

Now that this program is well established, LinkedIn is opening their platform up to all members. This doesn’t mean you and I can become part of the Influencer program. It doesn’t mean that you will instantly become a thought leader. It does mean that you can now blog on the LinkedIn platform and have it associated with your profile. Following will now become part of the regular vocabulary on LinkedIn. Someone can follow your posts without asking your permission to connect.

Create a Plan to Drive Traffic

Now matter how starry-eyed you become about the potential, and I mean potential and not real, reach of these blog posts, you should create a plan that still drives readers back to a site you own, like a company blog or web site. LinkedIn is still a platform that you cannot control. As they roll out this platform, things will change.

Write Unique Content

Your plan needs to focus on great content. If you really want to make an impact on LinkedIn look at the popular Influencer articles and see what resonates with professionals. There are no cat videos or list-based articles. It’s a look of good, solid advice that appeals to a general audience, but with a focus on careers, business growth, technology and entrepreneurship. Don’t syndicate your content between your blog and LinkedIn. Create unique posts for LinkedIn and offer more on your own blog. If your LinkedIn posts are general, your content on your blog can be a bit more specific and focused on your prospects.

Include Calls-to-Action

Have you seen what many of the influencers do on their posts? Subscribe to my blog. Follow me on Twitter. Sign up for my newsletter. While this overload of actions can cause readers to do nothing, the idea is still sound. Blog posts need calls-to-action. A connection to stay informed about future posts or activities is fine. Connecting them to another post you have published is great. Driving them to a landing page to download additional content works too. View these posts as above the top of your funnel and think how can you convert them with content and identify those who are prospects.

Use the Platform to Grow Your Reach

Posts will show up on your personal profile, so make sure you share them on the company page and within any active groups. Ask your colleagues, partners and customers to share these posts on their LinkedIn profiles (and other social channels) to get more reach on LinkedIn. There may be a most popular posts, like the Influencers have, so it will be beneficial to get lots of views on your posts. And don’t forget that you can tag people in updates that include a link to the post to make them aware of it, but don’t go overboard. You can also follow others and they may see you followed them. Until this is fully rolled out, we don’t know the complete functionality.

Share Your Unique Posts on Other Platforms

Each LinkedIn post has its own URL, which means you can share these posts on Twitter, Facebook and any other platforms where your prospects spend their time. You can even include them in an email newsletter to drive more traffic to them.

What are you thinking about the new blogging platform embedded in LinkedIn? Are you working on that plan yet?

The Search for Meaning in B2B Marketing

b2b-marketing-meaningOur friend Doug Kessler of Velocity Partners has written a lot about the what and the how of B2B marketing, but never the why. In this amazing Slideshare presentation called The Search for Meaning in B2B Marketing, and embedded below, he tackles the question of what makes his career in B2B marketing meaningful.

In addition to the ideas expressed, pay attention to the presentation itself. Presented as a notebook with handwritten notes, sketches and more formal type, this comes across as the simple musings of a creative guy (which Doug certainly is). He really captures the right tone and visual style in this piece. And the voyeuristic quality of reading someone else’s notebook makes it even more fun.

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The honesty of Doug’s writing really creates a connection with his audience of B2B marketers. While he is working out meaning in his own career, he hopes that it helps others in the field. My favorite line is:

When you were a kid, you never said, “I want to be a B2B marketer when I grow up.”

You definitely need to check out the whole notebook, but here are the seven things that give his work as a B2B marketer meaning:

1. I like helping companies grow.

2. I Like helping our clients achieve success in their careers.

3. I love working alongside talented, engaged, positive people who also love what they do.

4. I love learning new things.

5. I love work that demands creativity.

6. I like honest work that asks me to build a great case for my client.

7. I like figuring out how the business of business works.

Are there other things that give meaning to your career as a B2B marketer?

5 Ways B2B Companies Can Take Advantage of Facebook

b2b-facebookFacebook is a platform used by brands to reach millions of consumers, but don’t discount it for B2B companies. The most commonly used social networking site for many B2B companies is LinkedIn, but Facebook is an easy-to-use option as well.

1. Develop a Strategy

The first way to take advantage of Facebook is to create a content strategy. Instead of planning out how your company will market itself on Facebook, you can plan how you will market across all types of traditional and online marketing, then work Facebook into that plan. This creates marketing materials that are more consistent with the brand image that you want, and also gains more exposure throughout various media, which allows you to reach more people.

2. Keep Things Visual

When prospects look at your company’s Facebook page, your cover photo and the images you share will stand out. The more photographs and other graphics that are on a page, the more scannable it becomes. You can accompany the images with creative captions since prospects are more likely to read a caption on an image versus reading plain text. If your business participates in community events or charity initiatives, consider sharing photos of those on your B2B company Facebook page.

3. Generate Buzz

With Facebook you can build an audience of fans that follow your business and you can try to activate them to take additional action. Some companies spotlight their fans to help them feel more appreciated. Hosting giveaways and offering free or discounted items also helps promote your page and gain more followers. Getting fans to engage with your posts, especially sharing, can get your content in front of their friends.

4. Connect with Your Partners

If any of your partners have Facebook pages, make sure to like their page and ask them to like yours. You might share relevant content or link to their blog posts or other content. This can help build the connection between your business and theirs, and fans of their Facebook page can view your company’s page because of the shared content.

5. Mobile Access

If someone posts a question to your Facebook page on a Friday evening and your staff won’t be back in the office until Monday morning, you may lose a potential customer in the interim. Staying connected during hours that you are closed is crucial in maintaining the constant connection that people have come to expect. Purchase a tablet and assign a staff member to check in regularly. This also improves your company’s customer service, which is a key part of a successful business strategy. With so many avenues for disgruntled customers to voice their opinions, it is best to try to support a good relationship with all of your online fans.

Using Facebook for your B2B relationships is very beneficial to growing and activating your network of customers and prospects. How has your B2B company utilized Facebook?

10 Ways to Drive Traffic to Your B2B Website with Twitter Influencers

b2b-twitter-logoFor B2B marketers, Twitter can a very powerful tool to build relationships and drive traffic to your blog. But most business marketers still don’t get it.

How can you cut through the noise? How can you get your tweets seen and even clicked through on this massive site?

Influence marketing.

Influence marketing is getting your industry social influencers to share your content to their Twitter followers. 92% of us trust peer recommendations for product choices and brand preferences. Use prominent influencers in your sector to gain reach, trust, and drive traffic to your website.

Here are 10 ways to act on it:

1. Find your influencers

Do a Twitter search to find your industry leaders, and influential customers. Your customers are some of your most powerful influencers these days. They can be the most passionate about your brand, and can easily spread the word about you through Twitter. Check out popular niche hashtags to find top tweeters of your keywords. Follow them.

2. Make influencer lists

Once you’ve found your influencers on Twitter, make Lists to follow your their updates on the site. You could make a few influencer lists, such as:

  • Industry leaders
  • Influential partners
  • Influential customers

b2b-twitter-list

3. Retweet your influencers

Share your people’s tweets, when they post valuable content for your own followers. Retweet inspirational quotes and images, with links. Especially retweet content to their blog.

4. Use @mentions

@mentions get your tweets seen by your influencers. They’re the tweets that most busy tweeters check, and they’re much more effective than a Direct Message. Connect directly by showing your influencers you value their insights – ask a question in their area of expertise, or share good news about them.
b2b-twitter-connect

5. Tweet their blog articles

Show that you read your leading influencer articles – and that you appreciate their knowledge. @mention when you do, with your own positive comments, to build a more personal relationship.

6. Favorite tweets

You can also Favorite influencer tweets, to develop relationships, and show that you read what they’re tweeting. They’ll notice when you’ve engaged with a like of their content.
b2b-twitter-favorite

7. Respond to @mentions

When an influencer, customer (or anyone) mentions you on Twitter, respond. Keep the dialogue going to network with your connections.

8. Write great blog content

As a business, you need to write blog articles – and they should be good quality content. The better your content, and more relevant to your market, the more likely your blog will be tweeted by your influencers. Getting your blog tweeted by influencers drives traffic to your site.

9. Write about influencers on your blog

Give a shout-out to your influential customers and industry leaders. You could:

  • Write about customer success stories
  • Quote tips, inspirations, or product reviews of leaders
  • Crowdsource your content by asking industry leaders for their views on a subject – then compile a list of the best responses

Source your influencers in your article, by giving them links back to their site. Then tweet it to them. They’ll likely share it with their followers – with a link back to your site.

10. Network for guest blogging opportunities

Guest blogging can drive traffic to your site. Network with influential bloggers in your niche. Use Twitter to develop your relationships, and share your previous articles. Ask to submit an article for their blog. They’ll likely tweet your post to their followers – and their readers might too!

I’ve found Twitter to be an incredibly cool way to meet my industry influencers – around the world. I hope you’ll act on these tips to get your business better connected too!

Do you have any more ways that you connect with influencers on Twitter? Let me know in the comments below.

B2B Marketers Must Balance Organic and Paid on Facebook

b2b-facebook-earn-itJim Tobin is the president and founder of Ignite Social Media and the author of the new book, Earn It. Don’t Buy It. The CMO’s Guide to Social Media Marketing in a Post Facebook World. I recently had the chance to sit down with him and talk about the book.

What are the big ideas behind the book?

I’ve been a little frustrated over the past few years. In the early days of social media you couldn’t buy social media coverage. We were all social media marketers. How did we get people to care about our content? There weren’t even fan pages. How did you get people to care about this brand and talk about it online? That was the most challenging marketing ever. The traditional advertising that I used to do seems painfully easy compared to that. And in the past couple of years we’ve gone from zero to six billion dollars in advertising on Facebook and half a billion on Twitter. And it’s supposed to grow a billion dollars next year.

If you think about who controls these budgets, it’s people who are used to spending money on ads. They’ve gotten away from who cares and who is this going to resonate with and they are just throwing money at impressions and exposure. I’ve seen enough with my clients to know that organic exposure drives better business results. Measurably better business results. It goes back to discovery, the momentum effect and how people feel when they discover something. We are better off if we get back to being social media marketers, not social media advertisers. Not that there is no place for advertising, but maybe the ad budgets should have been three billion, not six billion. That other three billion into great content would have driven huge dividends.

The second point is illustrated by the subtitle: The CMO’s guide to social media marketing in a post-Facebook world. We’ve gotten into this feeling over the past couple of years that social media marketing is Facebook and social media marketing is content in the stream. It’s Oreo. It’s funny memes. And that’s just such a fraction of what social media marketing is. I amassed this data just by paying attention to the fact that Facebook has huge problems. My teenagers aren’t on there anymore. Everyone I talk to says that it is less interesting than it was six months ago. As marketers, what does that mean? We need to prepare for a multi-channel, multi-social world and a lot of people are not doing that.

How do you reconcile the need for organic interaction with Facebook’s stance that paid advertising is the only way to get in front of people in their streams.

I don’t know if Facebook has realized it yet, but they have only one choice, and that’s to loosen up the feed [and show more content]. They have tightened it twice, first in September/October last year and again early this year. The satisfaction among users has plunged. Facebook is boring. In part because I see the same stories. This story bumping they introduced a couple of months ago is horrific. I’m seeing the same story over and over again. And marketers are angry. A lot of my clients have really big Facebook budgets. Advertising budgets in the hundreds of millions of dollars. And they are really upset with how little coverage they get organically. So you have the brands that pay the bills upset and you have users who are saying this isn’t interesting.

On the side you have Twitter who was asleep for four years suddenly doing great things and being really interesting. Facebook says they have five times the content of tv. You wouldn’t know it. They’re doing a good job hiding it from everybody. There’s this battle now that Twitter is winning, and Facebook can only win if they loosen up the newsfeed. They’ve also said that they are only going to show an ad for 1 in 20 updates. If you tighten up the newsfeed, you restrict your own revenue. The best way to increase it, without getting off that 1 in 20 is to show more content. So it helps the user. It helps the brands, who are less angry about spending, because they are seeing some organic stuff on the channel. If they don’t do that, in three years they are dead.

Where does Facebook sit on a CMO’s radar?

Picture the CMO has a grid of things he or she has to think about. There’s a ton of stuff in that grid. The 4Ps [price, product, promotion and place] are there. In one corner, probably big enough to take a quadrant, is digital marketing. And a quadrant of that is social media marketing. And a sub quadrant of that is Facebook marketing. So it’s a medium to large sized dot in the corner.

The reason I am talking to the CMO is because they are the ones who think they have solved it by allocating budget to it. You should allocate budget to social media, but the mix is wrong. It should go much more toward content, toward feeding really good fans, rather than amassing 18 million fans, of which 2 million are good.

There’s data in the book from one of our clients. We map their interaction rate and their reach percentage for the four months before they ran a large fan acquisition buy. And then we map it after. They lost two-thirds of their engagement and 60% of their reach. They killed their own page. There’s no point in having a fan that you can’t activate. They’re making huge mistakes to brag about hitting a number of fans, whether it’s one million, five million, ten million fans, whatever the next milestone is. A few of my clients have started to come around. They don’t care about how many fans they have anymore. They care about activating them. And that’s really what it’s about. If you can’t get them to share content or come to your website or give you their email address or put your product in their shopping cart there’s no point in having them. That’s a message that hasn’t gone up to the C-suite.

So how does this relate specifically to B2B companies trying to use Facebook for social media marketing?

With the way the sales cycle works, and that your buyers are 60-70% of the way through the sales cycle before contacting you, your content has to do so much more work in building authority and trust. As an agency, I am a B2B marketer. We spend a lot of time on our blog creating content that is not link bait. We’re not copying Buzzfeed. We want the small amount of the right people to read our content and decide that we are smart. You can’t do that with ads. When the book came out my marketing team wanted to buy ads. That would be ironic at best.

Jay Baer, author of Youtility, who wrote the forward, talks about how do you add value. Because of the nature of B2B marketing (long sales cycle, committee decision making, etc), I will never be in a position to know when someone is looking for a social media agency. I can’t do a calling program to convince them that they need one or that they need to change. They need to determine those things on their own. But we put a lot into our content and earning shares in the right places where the right people will see it, including LinkedIn.

Every week we track top of the funnel traffic, total visitors, leads and pitches. And we see where it all comes from. We’ve gotten posts on the front page of Reddit and they drive a quarter of a million views, but they are of no value. While we track the top of the funnel, that’s not the big goal. It is important because a percentage is going to qualify. If you look at the trend data, you would think we need to get on Reddit again. But that’s not the right audience. We need people to value our content and to believe we know what we’re talking about. And Facebook is often the wrong platform for B2B. Good B2B marketers have been thinking beyond it since the beginning.

You’ve got to remember why you need page views. Buzzfeed needs page views because they are serving up ads. But we’re not. We need page views because the people need to conclude that we are really smart. So if you hook them in and you stop at 300 words when you’ve got 1200 words of really good information on that topic, you’re not doing yourself any favors.

Your content has to be good enough to change minds over time, not just to drive traffic.

LinkedIn Launches Company Showcase Pages for B2B Brands

LinkedIn announced showcase pages as an expansion of company pages. B2B companies can now create “dedicated pages for their more prominent brands, businesses and initiatives.” These new pages can be individually followed and feature their own stream of status updates, or content. Adobe, Cisco, HP and Microsoft launched the showcase pages first and we will look at some examples of what they have done.

Prior to the launch of the showcase pages, if you wanted to highlight your products, you added all of your products or services to the Product tab and each one looked like this. It had a brief product overview, some additional elements on the right hand side like contact information and a video, but the main function of this page was to gather recommendations for the product. Note that Adobe has 45 product pages like this.
b2b-LinkedIn-Adobe-Showcase3

Now Adobe, and you, can create a dynamic page with a 974 pixel wide by 330 pixel high hero image at the top, and people can follow this page to receive your updates. Adobe has focused on their highest level products for their showcase pages: Marketing Cloud and Creative Cloud. That means they are now managing a content feed for two products, not 45.
b2b-LinkedIn-Adobe-Showcase1

How does one find these showcase pages? Look in the right hand side of a company page, and there will be branch diagram like this if the company has created the showcase pages.
b2b-LinkedIn-Cisco-Showcase1

But notice that you only see three showcase pages in the sidebar. When you click “See more,” you see a window like this. You only see four pages and you have to scroll to see more. The number of followers beyond the first three pages drops off significantly, so make sure you have a plan and a need for more than three or four pages before you create them. LinkedIn will let you create up to 10.
b2b-LinkedIn-Cisco-Showcase2

Cisco has taken a different approach to their showcase pages, and rather than create them around products, they created them around topic areas that include many different products. This way they can encourage people to follow the topic and they can share updates with them about the topic.
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Here are some things to notice about these showcase pages. There is a standard size logo in lower left with the page name in white type. When the header section is expanded you can see other showcase pages that are connected to the company. And there is a prominent “Follow” button in the lower right of the hero image with a number of followers. And Cisco, with only five showcase pages, has already broken branding consistency with their hero image design. Some have collages, and others have a single image. One even has a tagline on the image. And this one below has a band at the top that says Internet of Things.
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The HP image has a URL as part of it. These images are not able to link to destination, although images at the top of the traditional product page can. This image is in the same style as others on the HP Cloud website destination, but this specific image doesn’t appear. And the free trial landing page doesn’t have an image at all. It would be nice if there were some visual reference to this showcase page, although this gentleman does appear on their Twitter background. This makes me think he is part of a larger campaign.
b2b-LinkedIn-HP-Showcase

And finally, Microsoft has created two showcase pages, one for Office and one for Dynamics, shown here. This image appears on both Twitter and Facebook, so this page is branded consistently with Dynamics’ other social channels. This is a product focused showcase page, and the updates are all about the product, rather than a larger idea. Since it is going to take some work to get people to follow these showcase pages, there is some logic behind sharing content that is much further along in the buying cycle, rather than trying to attract brand new prospects.
b2b-LinkedIn-Microsoft-Showcase

And two final points to note:

  • Showcase page updates can be targeted and sponsored so they will appear in the newsfeed of non-followers
  • Showcase page updates can be managed with social media management tools that connect to company pages

Do these showcase pages seem to be all about big brands and not relevant to smaller B2B companies, or do these give you ideas about how to segment your LinkedIn company updates? Let us know in the comments below.

Latest Summary of New Twitter Features and B2B Best Practices

b2b-twitter-birdIt has been hard to avoid articles and stories about Twitter since last week’s IPO, but nothing about their stock offering has helped B2B marketers improve their use of the social network to connect with customers and prospects, amplify their content and maximize the use of the latest feature updates. Below are several articles that provide some in-depth coverage of these features, as well as a video explaining why B2B companies should be using Twitter and a Slideshare deck with best practices from leading Tweeters.

If you have come across other great Twitter resources, please add them in the comments below.

7 Big, Recent Twitter Changes you Should Know About to Optimize Your Tweeting
Wow, it’s really not a small task these days to keep up with all the recent changes to Social Media. As Twitter continues to grow, the company is making big changes more often and they’re easy to miss. In case you didn’t catch them, I collected seven of the most recent Twitter changes to get you up to speed.
Continue reading

A/B Test Finds 55% Increase in Leads When Images Added to Tweets [New Data]
Does Twitter look a little different for you lately? Maybe a little more like Facebook or Instagram? That’s because on October 29, the social networking site announced that it will start automatically showing images in your stream (without you even clicking).
As a social media marketer, you can imagine how excited I was to test this out for HubSpot. All I saw was a gold mine of opportunities for sharing our blog posts, ebooks, templates, webinars, and other expert resources in a visually appealing way.
Continue reading

How Twitter Custom Timelines May Boost Twitter’s Reach Into The Web
Twitter has a new way to allow people to curate tweets — Twitter Custom Timelines. Why does it need this when it already had another long-standing tool for tweet curation, Twitter Lists? The new system may allow brands to make better use of embedded tweets than lists allow, which in turn may further extend Twitter’s reach into the Web.
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Twitter for B2B Organizations

B2B Marketing in the Noisy World of Twitter

Two Examples of Stellar B2B Facebook Pages

Facebook is a huge topic of interest to B2B marketers, so we wanted to share two examples of stellar B2B Facebook Pages, as a follow-up to How to Build a Great B2B Community on Facebook. That post was the first part of a MarketingProfs B2B Forum presentation and here are the case studies from the second part.

Examples of Interaction on Facebook

B2B-Facebook-MarketingProfs
Corey O’Loughlin is a community manager for MarketingProfs. She shared the interaction and impact of their Facebook initiatives (go ahead and like them if you haven’t already!).

At a high level, Corey outlined the following goals for their Facebook initiatives:

  • Map goals – MarketingProfs does engage in sales via Facebook but had examples for effective integration throughout the presentation
  • Create content
  • Get feedback
  • Drive membership
  • Show personality

Corey shared a series of examples from the MarketingProfs Facebook page, walking the audience from Facebook update through impact in overall content marketing initiative.

Example: 15 Marketing Buzzwords to Stop Using
A question, discussion, and response from this update, poking fun at marketing buzzwords turned into a Slideshare presentation, blog post, and follow up series.

The presentation hit the hot spot on Slideshare three different times and could be traced back to 500 new members.

Example: 8 Misconceptions About a Remote Workforce
Newsjacking Yahoo’s announcement eliminating their remote workforce, MarketingProfs (who’s workforce is completely remote) used a similar strategy, leveraging the actively participated in Facebook discussion to generate a presentation, which now has over 80,000 views on Slideshare.

A few other ideas to consider:

  • Fill-in-the-blanks are great for developing discussion
  • Negative updates tend to do better than positive ones, but use them judiciously
  • Updates can be great for getting feedback for challenges or issues (Corey cited an example of understanding their lack of pickup on mobile marketing events even though broader interests seemed so high)
  • Doodles and images work and MarketingProfs is lucky to have such a talented artist on their team

From a sales perspective, Corey showed an example of a creative brand-based selling action / promotion. The key is to be creative in communication and execution. The end result was that even though the update itself had very little engagement, they still sold five passes to this event.

Content Makes Your Boring B2B Business Less Boring

B2B-Facebook-Constant-Contact
Kristen Curtiss is the social media specialist who takes on the daily challenge of making sure Constant Contact customers stay engaged with the business through social media. Believe it or not, email is not very exciting without a bit of valuable content to keep things moving.

High level results of Constant Contact’s Facebook initiatives:

  • Over 91,000 Facebook Likes
  • 59,000+ fans (likes) gained in a two year period
  • 13% of fans have connected (interacted) with the page

Constant Contact uses a mixture of posts and updates to develop reach and engagement. Some of their best practices include:

  • Custom images work – they started by just using photos but found that adding “thought bubbles” and other customizations worked better for engagement
  • Remember marketing objective – Constant Contact consistently queries their audience to find out what they are most concerned with
  • Text only posts tend to get more reach from fans; even more so than images. Constant Contact uses a 50/50 mix of image and text updates to keep things balanced
  • They only post links to the site once a week because they get the least engagement (as opposed to images and text)
  • Constant Contact uses Facebook chats. They created a custom image that points to a chat on Facebook, which in turn helps develop customer understanding
  • Customer feedback is very important – Facebook is an important tool for them to message customers about issues / service and feedback on new functionality and development
  • Kristen recommends running social campaigns via tabs on Facebook and make certain to cross pollinate efforts (for example, their Facebook initiatives are embedded through other marketing channels like email distribution)

Lastly and most importantly, HAVE FUN! Remember that the key to getting good engagement rates is to keep things lively and conversational.

How to Build a Great B2B Community on Facebook

b2b-facebookWe know you (yes, you B2B marketer) are skeptical. The social network of choice for many B2B marketers is LinkedIn. Even though Facebook is the largest social network by far (and one of the most trafficked websites overall), B2B marketers remain skeptical of Facebook’s viability for marketing impact.

Mike Lewis, Chief Marketing Officer of Peoplefluent kicked things off his session at MarketingProfs B2B Forum with a few important statistics courtesy of a recent Hubspot report about Facebook:

  • 750 million monthly visitors
  • 51% more likely to make a purchase after they “liked” a brand on Facebook
  • 41% of B2Bs surveyed indicated they have acquired customers through Facebook

Here are three examples of B2B Facebook pages worth reviewing:

Mike also showed a business page he worked on – Awareness Social Media Best Practices – and the key is / was content and communication (and literally, “best practices”). The page went from 0 – 10k likes in 2011 and more importantly the organization could track 22% of leads back to a first interaction on this Facebook page.

What makes these examples outstanding?

  • Audience engagement
  • Compelling and relevant conversations
  • Encouraging the share
  • No selling (direct selling at least)

6 Keys to effective B2B Facebook page development:

  • Paying Attention
  • Interaction
  • Content
  • Presence
  • Management
  • Measurement

On paying attention: listen to people and their actions and behaviors. This is the heart of a Facebook strategy but more importantly (taking a phrase from Chris Brogan – paraphrasing) ”It’s not what you say, it’s about what you hear.”

  • Why are you listening?
  • Where are you going to listen?
  • What are you going to pay attention to?

Silo your attention based on brand, keywords, buying signals, etc. Understand the market landscape, brand, competition, customers, influencers, buying intent phrases (situational, problems, etc), and of course, what’s happening on the page itself.

If attention is the yin, interaction is the yang. Mike outlined how to understand your extended audience, since your direct competition is not necessarily your competition on Facebook. You’re also competing with other brands, a person’s friends, family, network, etc.

At a high level, here is your extended audience and the basis for how to communicate with them:

  • Broad Extended Audience – share photos and videos
  • Passive – ask questions
  • Moderate – consistency is key
  • Active – make them champions
  • Influential – guest post opportunities

Considerations for improving and developing presence:

  • Use milestones
  • Star and highlight important information
  • Connect other channels
  • Use custom tabs within your Facebook page
  • Maintain consistent branding across Facebook page

All in all great examples and ideas that hopefully can sway a skeptical B2B market audience to do more with Facebook.