5 Ways to Use Your LinkedIn Profile to Attract Inbound B2B Leads

b2b-LinkedIn-LogoMy friend Tom Skotidas and I are at it again and this time we talked about how anyone, but especially B2B sales pros, can use their LinkedIn profile to attract inbound leads. Tom calls this inbound social selling. He is the founder of Skotidas, Asia Pacific’s leader in B2B Social Media Lead Generation. We have been talking about the intersection of sales and content marketing for B2B companies. A lot of people call this social selling, but there is more to it than just that.

1. Re-Think the Purpose of Your Profile

Rather than just create a profile that shows your job history and qualifications, create a profile that shows how you can solve your target audience’s problems and serve their needs. Think of your profile as a piece content that reflects your company’s capabilities, rather than your resume.

2. Use the Right Keywords

Throughout your LinkedIn profile you should use keywords that are related to your products and services. Not just any keywords, but ones that your prospects commonly use. One way to determine those keywords is by using Google’s Keyword Ad Planner Tool. It is designed to help determine keywords for Google ads, so you need an AdWords account (connected to a regular Google account), but you don’t need to place any ads to use the tool.

3. View Your LinkedIn Profile as a Web Page to be Indexed

As you are re-thinking about your LinkedIn profile and using the appropriate keywords, remember that this is a web page that is indexed by Google and other search engines. LinkedIn is a high-ranking domain and can show up as a top result in searches for your keywords.

4. Don’t Forget About LinkedIn Search

Active LinkedIn users use the search functions within LinkedIn to find what they are looking for, beyond people’s names and companies.

5. Optimize These 9 Fields in Your LinkedIn Profile

Once you have your keywords to attract your prospects, what do you do with them? There are several fields in your LinkedIn profile that Tom identified as the most relevant.

  • Headline: The default is your current job at your current company. This is the most important thing to change to appeal to prospects.
  • Contact Information: This should include the best ways to contact you, plus a website or landing page that includes information to your target prospects
  • Summary: This is where you can really speak to the prospect about how you and your company can solve their business problems, using a good selection of keywords.
  • Experience: What you do in your job is another opportunity to tell the story of your success helping customers solve problems.
  • Marketing Assets: Work with your marketing team to get Powerpoints and PDFs to add to your LinkedIn profile and use your keywords in the title of the pieces.
  • Skills & Endorsements: Have others endorse you for skills that are most relevant to your target prospects. You have the ability to edit your list of skils.
  • Publications: Relevant blog posts, ebooks or articles quoting you can be listed here. If you don’t have any, this is a good time see if you can collaborate with someone to create some things to list.
  • Recommendations: Ask your customers for recommendations. They will use the terms that others in your industry use, and they will also validate your position as someone who is helpful.
  • Groups Joined: The Groups you join show on your profile, so make sure you join relevant Groups with names that look and sound good.

What have you done on your LinkedIn profile to attract B2B prospects?

7 Ways Your Sales Team Can Get Results with B2B Social Media

b2b-social-sellingAre your salespeople actively engaged in social media as part of their lead generation efforts? If not, they (and your business) are missing out on great opportunities for researching potential B2B clients, building new networks and uncovering prospects by investigating their social media profiles.

Here are ways to encourage your sales team to embrace social media:

1. Direct your salespeople to refine their profiles

Start by making sure they have social media profiles on the appropriate channels. The marketing team can help determine where your customers and prospects those platforms. Their profile pages need to attract potential customers. While including the basics on an individual salesperson, the profile should mostly focus on your business and the solutions you offer to prospects. Also include videos, PDFs and links to your business website in these profiles.

2. Schedule time for focused social media activity

It takes discipline to use social media properly (and avoid wasting time watching cat videos!). Work with your sales team to plot out a schedule of focused activity on various social media networks, whether it’s a half-hour a day or 2-3 times a week.

3. Generate content your sales team can use

Back in the day, salespeople handed out brochures or fliers to interest prospects. Today, it’s all about customized content marketing. So it’s up to you to ensure your salespeople can refer prospects to first-rate, problem-solving content on your business website. Not only will this draw more traffic to your site, it also supports the sales team’s efforts to position your business as an industry and thought leader.

4. Promote sales blogging

It’s no longer enough to feature a blog post from your CEO or CMO. Members of your sales team should also be blogging and steadily building a rich network of followers. Encourage team members to think about new ways to focus on prospects’ needs and business challenges by answering common questions that prospects ask in their buyer journey. They should also think and blog more broadly about general industry issues, rather than shilling for your business. Again, focus on solutions your sales team can provide and that will draw more interest from prospects.

5. Keep an active LinkedIn presence

For sales of B2B products and services, LinkedIn is probably the most significant platform for your sales team’s activities. Your individual salespeople’s LinkedIn profiles are the first place a prospect will check out, so as noted above, be sure these are up-to-date and contain the right messaging.

Also, each salesperson should be gathering new LinkedIn connections as frequently as possible. Have them build their network by reaching out to past customers, colleagues in the industry, friends and family members. It’s important to have a robust network of connections as part of your LinkedIn profile.

By joining and participating in LinkedIn discussion groups, salespeople will come in contact with a wide range of potential customers — though it’s important to remember these discussion groups are about specific issues, not a venue for blatant self-promotion. Encourage your sales team to answer questions that demonstrate their problem-solving knowledge. An interested prospect will often follow up on his own.

6. Use Twitter to make connections and follow trends

The businesses and prospects you want to connect with may be tweeting. Shouldn’t you and your sales team be listening? Twitter offers a wealth of opportunities for staying abreast of industry trends, which can in turn help your team anticipate future sales opportunities. Once your salesperson has become comfortable on the platform, he or she can reply individually to a prospect’s tweet, thus initiating a one-on-one exchange which turns a cold lead into a warm one.

7. Have a vibrant Facebook presence

Your business should already have a Facebook page. From there, encourage members of your sales team to create a Facebook group that relates to your business offerings and invite people to join. Once the group starts talking, there’s always an opportunity to send targeted messages to individuals within the group and get the sales process moving forward.

Being active in social media isn’t a substitute for picking up the phone or firing off an email to prospects, but it represents a dramatically different way of cultivating leads and enriching your sales pipeline.

Photo: Flickr

5 Ways B2B Companies Can Generate Leads on Twitter

b2b-twitter-birdMany B2B businesses have a Twitter account these days, but simply being on Twitter is not enough.

If you or your employees are going to spend time using social media networks, there have to be objectives and it has to work for your business.

It’s fine if you want to use Twitter as a news publication feed – but there’s so much more you can do with it as a B2B communication tool.

Why not use Twitter as part of your new business strategy? If it’s not going to help your business grow and develop, then you’re really wasting time. Get your new business development team involved with planning your Twitter profile. You can also find out their tactics and make sure social media is integrated and woven in to really work together.

Twitter works best when there’s some level of personalization and chat. As well as a news feed, Twitter acts as an introduction service essentially, as it is so easy to connect with people.

There’s an old adage that says products don’t sell, people sell. So use Twitter for the communication tool that it is and get chatting.

1. Give your organization a face

Let people know who they’re talking to instead of a faceless organization. Having a corporate account is important, but it’s very hard to hold a conversation with someone if you don’t know who you’re talking to. Add the personal Twitter handles of those who are talking into your bio, so people know who you are, and can also follow your personal accounts.

2. Share content to drive people to your website

A varied content schedule should incorporate a mix of updates, interesting articles as well as company news. However, make sure you create and post content which gives people the opportunity to visit your website or specific landing pages.

This can be via blog and news posts, new sections or products which have launched or anything else of interest to your customers.

3. Mention people you have met

People like being mentioned on Twitter – it starts conversations and you get to know people and they get to know you. If you’ve been to a networking event, conference or meeting, give the event and anyone you’ve met a shout out and cement the contacts you’ve made.

This reminds people who you are, gives them your contact details and can often lead to further communication and a meeting.

4. Use Twitter to create warm leads

Your new business development manager could sit down and plow through a lot of cold calls with relevant businesses but this is really a shot in the dark. However, if you start connecting with other businesses and other business people through Twitter, this is a friendly way to introduce your company and start to form a relationship.

Start to follow any people or businesses you think have new business potential. You could mention a blog post they’ve written or comment on some of their business news – anything that opens a conversation. They key is to start that conversation, not start a sale.

5. Assess your progress regularly

It sounds simple, but this is something many companies forget to do. You need to decide on some objectives and metrics to measure these objectives. These might be to increase relevant followers by so many every quarter, to set up a certain number of business meetings and achieve a certain number of click-throughs to your website.

Have you been successful at generating new business for your B2B company on Twitter? Let us know in the comments below.

REPORTS: LinkedIn is the Most Effective B2B Social Network

b2b-LinkedIn-LogoLinkedIn has always been the social network that gets the business attention, especially from B2B marketers. If you are trying to justify resources (time and money) for focusing on LinkedIn, several reports combine to make the case that results are real. But like everything in social media, use these resources to guide your thinking while you discover if your customers are there.

1. LinkedIn Drives More Traffic

In this recent post, Webbiquity looks at the top social networks and analyzes how they drive traffic to B2B blogs and websites. On average, social media drove 5% of traffic to all B2B sites, however, it drove 17% of traffic to blogs and only 1.1% of traffic to commercial B2B websites. When they looked at the traffic by site, 90% of the social traffic was driven by the big three networks, with half of it coming from LinkedIn.
Share-of-B2B-Social-Traffic1

2. LinkedIn Drives More Leads

In a study of over 5,000 businesses, HubSpot found that traffic from LinkedIn generated the highest visitor-to-lead conversion rate at 2.74%, almost 3 times higher than both Twitter and Facebook. This was a mix of both B2B and B2C companies, but the large sample size clearly shows that a focus on driving leads from LinkedIn works.
b2b-linkedin-social-conversion

3. Your B2B Marketing Peers Use It

Across multiple studies, eMarketer has found that an average of 80% of mostly B2B and small and medium sized businesses use LinkedIn for marketing. A number this high, across multiple studies, really adds to the validity of the number. While this study doesn’t define what how marketers use the platform, or how effective they view it, the next point addresses that.
b2b-linkedin-marketing-usage

4. B2B Marketers Call It the Most Effective Social Network

In a recent content marketing survey of the 50,000 member strong B2B Technology Marketing community on LinkedIn, 85% of those surveyed indicated that LinkedIn was the most effective social network for distributing content.
b2b-linkedin-marketing-effectiveness

5. LinkedIn is Creating More Marketing Opportunities

A recent eMarketer report describes the changes coming to LinkedIn as they grow their ad revenue business with a variety of sponsored opportunities beyond text and banner ads. These include sponsored company updates, or what are called native ads in the feed, and ads that mimic the functionality of Slideshare, a platform they bought last year. As LinkedIn re-makes itself as a content platform, do not overlook the opportunities to post content directly on the platform as part of their thought leader blogging program, although it appears that they are not taking any new entries into the program.

B2B LinkedIn Takeaways

As you begin exploring the effectiveness of LinkedIn for your B2B company, here are some specific tactics that will build your following and drive traffic, leads and awareness. What are your favorite LinkedIn tactics?

  • Grow your LinkedIn Company followers by encouraging followers on other networks to follow the company on LinkedIn.
  • Share both gated and un-gated content on LinkedIn company page.
  • Encourage employees to share company content of their LinkedIn pages.
  • Discover LinkedIn Groups with your target prospects and encourage appropriate employees to participate in the conversation, not just share links.

10 B2B Social Media Predictions for 2013

It is that time of year again where we look forward and try to predict the future of social media for B2B companies. This is not a shot-in-the-dark exercise, but one based on observing how B2B companies have adopted social media over the past year. When we look back at 2013, we will not see a banner year with explosive growth in B2B social media. In many areas there will be continued gradual growth started in 2012 or earlier. If you have your own predictions or you disagree with ours, please let us know in the comments below.

1. There will be incremental growth in using social media for lead generation

Social media provides new and lower cost opportunities for B2B companies to generate leads, and the adoption of this continues to be slower than social media advocates would have you believe. Many B2B marketers still struggle to get the mechanics, tools and resources in place to build a robust social media lead generation program. More B2B companies will see success in generating leads with social media, but it will still not be the norm.

2. B2B CEOs will remain skeptical about social media

The disconnect between B2B marketers and their CEO about the value and application of social media will remain. Just like with the adoption of social media lead generation, there will be slight improvement, but it will not be a banner year. Many CMOs have seen the light, but there is not enough evidence from inside and outside the organization to convince the CEO. They will need another year of the pain of higher cost and inefficient lead programs before shifting to more cost effective social media marketing.

3. The chasm between B2B companies creating content and those who don’t will widen

Remarkable content will continue to distinguish B2B companies from their peers and competitors. Marketers who have mastered the art of blogging, ebooks, visual content and video storytelling will forge stronger relationships with prospects, customers and advocates, while those who don’t will get left behind. Customer expectations will drive this disparity even more in 2013.

4. The skills of B2B marketers will expand as content gets more visual

It starts with storytelling and interpreting data, but the new world marketers who will write their own tickets in 2013 are those who have a graphic design or photography background. The smaller explosive platforms like Pinterest and Instagram have driven up the importance of visual content, but Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn have all continued to incorporate rich media into their platforms. Marketing communication is no longer just about great writing. Look for fewer words from top B2B marketers and eye-catching visuals that promote compelling offers.

5. Data becomes more than a buzzword

Look for more B2B marketers to really understand the data components of their social media efforts in 2013. This is not about better measurement, but about compiling data to gain better insight into customers and prospects. This kind of data mining and interpretation gives marketers a more holistic view of social media profiles and activities, which lead to smarter and more informed actions.

6. The role of marketing automation becomes clearer

Sometimes B2B marketers need to say the name of their tools out loud to understand what they do. “Marketing Automation.” Say it again. “Marketing Automation.” You didn’t just say, “Sent spammy emails.” Expect to see better use of marketing tools in 2013 as B2B marketers do more than set up email drip campaigns, but unleash the full power of these tools to automate repetitive activities or other things that computers do better than people.

7. Mobile Strategies Catch Up to Reality (Again)

Repeat of 2012 Prediction: As each mobile device is released, it sells more than its predecessor. This will continue in [2013] and we will get closer and closer to the day the mobile web dominates B2B site traffic. B2B companies are on course to develop their mobile strategies so they can move forward with their customers. If every B2B marketer took their smart phone out of their pocket and suffered through their own website, this really would drive the creation of mobile-friendly sites.

8. B2B Marketers will determine relevant social media metrics

This is one prediction that I hope exceeds my expectations of how far it goes. Overall social media adoption hinges on better and more appropriate metrics. Lots of B2B marketers are still measuring vanity metrics or optimization metrics and reporting them as results. While the tactics of increasing reach will help you drive more leads, it is the leads themselves that are an indicator of your success, not the increased reach. Without the proper reporting in place that is connected to company business goals, there will be a social media backlash due to soft reporting.

9. B2B Marketers will get addicted to social media ads

B2B marketers will explore additional ways to build their audience and drive traffic to their lead-generation landing pages. Not only do social media ads fit this bill as a new tactic, but these ads will be less competitive and more cost-effective than pay-per-click (PPC) ads throughout 2013. That will change as more marketers start using them, but they will be regular part of the tool set before that happens.

10. Email usage will grow as B2B marketers struggle to generate leads with social media

As customers and prospects continue to click on email offers, B2B marketers will keep sending them, but with diminishing returns. This is still interruptive marketing, while social media acknowledges that the customer or prospect is in charge of the relationship. A tipping point is coming, but it won’t be in 2013.

There is still a tremendous amount of work for B2B marketers to do in 2013, but we know you can do it with planning, remarkable content, marketing and sales alignment and executive buy-in.

Photo Credit: One Way Stock

5 Ways to Measure Results of B2B Social Media

B2B marketers like to measure things. This is not measurement for its own sake, but to determine the results of their marketing efforts. Social media, since it occurs online, is filled with measurable elements, but it can sometimes be a challenge to know which ones are worth measuring.

Start by establishing a set of goals and objectives for your social media efforts. If these goals are realistic, and measurable, you can determine how you doing in social media by examining how you are hitting your goals. And it is super-awesome if these social media goals relate to your higher level business objectives. This is easier if your company has clear marching orders, but you should at least have some idea how your company is looking to grow its business.

1. Growth of Following

Every B2B company that starts in social media begins focused on increasing followers and fans across their social profiles. While this is a tactic that should be pursued to increase the reach of your following, it is not a metric that should be obsessively measured and reported to your management. This is better understood if and when you understand how your number of followers relates to conversions. If you know that for every 1000 followers or fans, you get five leads, that is useful information. If you are trying to get to 1000 followers just to show your boss that “social is working,” you have not demonstrated anything.

2. Conversions

Measuring conversions is the best place to start because these are actions your visitors and followers can take that have some connection to your business. You may have already determined that there is some value in these activities. This could be signing up for an email newsletter or subscribing to your company blog, but it could also be participating in a survey or leaving a blog comment. These are the things that take a visitor and get them closer to the top of the funnel. They may not be a lead yet (which we will look at next), but they have done something that shows they may have interest in you product or service in the future.

3. Leads and Sales

As many B2B companies have long sales cycles, leads are used as a proxy for sales. Generating leads through social media and tracking those efforts through your buying cycle should be one of main components of your social media efforts. If you are creating content on a blog, and you should be, to drive traffic to landing page offers for ebooks, webinars and other deeper educational content, the reporting depends on both your volume and the sophistication of your systems.

A raw number of leads generated from social media is a good start, but you should endeavor to push this further. Can you break it down by platform, offer and types of content? That’s the front end, but what about the back end? If you can measure how these leads convert to sales, then you have a better understanding of what types of content and activities appeal to your customers and prospects. This will allow you to further optimize your B2B social media efforts.

4. Cost Savings

Social media can reduce costs but you need to be realistic about measuring the real cost savings. Companies often cut outside expenses (traditional advertising and marketing) and replace them with internal costs (employee time), and the public perception of social media being free drives this approach. This does not take into account the employees’ time to create content content, manage social profiles, or even the other jobs functions that now get short-changed because they have added social media to their daily activities.

A better way to look at cost savings is to isolate it to a given activity, like customer service. Using social media to reduce the call volume of a call center is measurable if you know what an average call costs. Determine the average cost of resolving customer service issues via social media and the difference is your cost savings. Tracking this over time to meet a goal in call deflection is a measurable result. There may be upfront costs developing the process, training and materials for response, but over time, this can be more efficient for many companies.

5. Return on Investment

And finally, the last piece of measuring your results is determining the return on investment (ROI) of your efforts. This is simply determined by taking the return, or revenue, and subtracting the investment, or cost, and divide it by the cost. The hard part of determining ROI is to figure out what to include in the return and the cost. While you need to put some timeframe around these measurements, for example conduct a 90 day campaign to contain both the return and the investment, there are other ways to think of return. In The B2B Social Media Book, we suggest using a Lifetime Value of a Customer as a better return value than an individual sale. This really shows the true value of your activities to the business. The numbers are measured in dollars and the ROI is frequently expressed in a percentage. If you can accurately calculate the ROI of your social media efforts, you can compare them to other marketing activities to determine their cost-effectiveness.

Measuring B2B social media serves two main purposes. The first, and more important, is about determining success in meeting your social media goals, but the second is reporting on those results in a way that show the value of social media to your management. Ideally, there is no difference between the two. What has your experience been in developing measurable goals for social media, meeting them and reporting on them?

Creative Commons Image from Flickr

Only 13% of B2B Marketers Drive Leads with Social Media

In a recent study of B2B marketers by BtoB Magazine, 59% of those surveyed answered that online lead generation is their biggest marketing challenge. While email is their number one source of online leads, only 13% of respondents reported that social media was their greatest driver of leads.

The survey broke out marketers from agency professionals, which yields a bleaker picture. 18% of agency respondents are getting more leads from social media than other sources, while only 11% of marketers are. The study also found that only 5% felt that social media was a mature and well-optimized part of their marketing mix. 55% of those surveyed revealed that they were in the early stages of social media, and 14% of B2B companies were not using social media at all.

Does this survey seem in line with your experience of social media to drive leads and become fully integrated in your B2B company’s marketing mix?

Want to share some of these statistics.
I’ve make it easy for you:

Tweet This Stat 59% of B2B Marketers Find Driving Leads Online Their Biggest Challenge

Tweet This Stat 57% of B2B Marketers Get More Leads from Email Than Any Online Other Source

Tweet This Stat 20% of B2B Marketers Get More Leads from Paid Search Than Any Other Online Source

Tweet This Stat 13% of B2B Marketers Get More Leads from Social Media Than Any Other Online Source

Tweet This Stat 5% of B2B Companies Have Optimized Social Media into their Marketing Mix

Tweet This Stat 55% of B2B Companies are in the Early Stages of Social Media Marketing

Tweet This Stat 14% of B2B Companies are not using Social Media Marketing

Understand How B2B Social Media Connects to Your Audience

B2B social media is about connecting with prospects and customers, providing value to their business and tracking those interactions to leads and sales. Today’s round-up of posts address all of these issues.

I start with a post about click attribution, which makes the case for tracking all actions, not just first or last action. Not only does this give proper weight to your social activities, but it gives you a much better picture of all of your marketing activities. Next we look at a couple of articles that address the changing demographics of your target audience. Have you updated your personas to include millennial decision-makers? Their buying motivations and actions may be different from your traditional customers, and you might want to think about the gamification of your processes. The next post is just a reminder that prospects want to know what’s in it for them, and they don’t care about your products. I had to include this one since it is based on a presentation I gave last week, and even includes my slide as the graphic.

And finally, as reminder that Facebook Brand Pages are switching to the Timeline format the end of next week, here’s a pretty thorough review of B2B software product AutoCAD’s Facebook Page (pre-timeline), which now has one million fans. This should give you some ideas of ways to connect with your fans on this platform that is challenging for many B2B marketers.

B2B Marketers Need Every-Click Attribution
from Marketing Interactions
One of the beautiful things about digital B2B marketing is the ability to attribute behavior and engagement for prospects across a variety of channels that may be included in our marketing mix. Where things get a bit sticky is determining how attribution figures into revenue generation. For a simple transactional sale, this may be easier as sales cycles are shorter and less clicks are usually required. But, for a complex sale, attribution becomes a bigger challenge.
Continue reading

Millennials are making B2B buying decisions. Are you engaged with them?
from B2B Insights Blog
In a previous post I shared that Millenials are moving into management positions and are shaping business decisions. I suggested three attributes – tech-savvy, highly educated, and a passion for meaning in their work – that B2B marketers need to pay attention to if they want to communicate effectively with them. With this post, I’d like to give you a few more behavioral aspects that will likely influence how they make buying decisions and what you need to know so that you can engage with them.
Continue reading

4 Tips for Adding Gamification to Your Social Engagement Strategy
from Think Customers
While social media alone creates buzz around your brand, it’s gamification that drives engagement across your online community. That’s why many enterprise marketers are turning to gamification to measure and influence consumer behavior on their brand-owned Web and mobile sites.
Continue reading

Prospects Don’t Care About Your Products. They Want Solutions.
from Social Media Today
Jeffrey L. Cohen, of Radian6, spoke about this at the CloudForce Conference in San Francisco last week. It comes down to offering valuable content and building a trusted relationship as key elements to your sales and marketing strategy. People have very short attention spans, and businesses that understand this are producing a frictionless way for their customers to get the solutions they seek.
Continue reading

How AutoCAD Retooled Its Marketing With Facebook
from Social Media Examiner
Chris Hession has been a product and marketing manager for nearly 15 years. But recently, his job completely changed. “Just in the last year and a half, social media has become not just a component of our product marketing plan, but really the core component,” said Hession, currently senior manager of Autodesk’s AutoCAD product marketing.
Continue reading

Charting the B2B Social Media Lead Generation Process

We wrote a book about B2B social media to share our ideas with others and to help them learn how to adopt social media in their B2B companies. One sign of success is when people take the ideas and make them their own. This is something that the web has always been good for. People gather ideas, remix them and create their own content from them. We were pretty excited to see the book review from Aarne Töllinen, Project Manager at University of Jyväskylä. And thankfully it is written in English, because we don’t speak Finnish.

The cool part of the review is that it includes a graphic showing the social media lead generation process. While not a fancy infographic, it still is easy to see the flow of the process. Leads come in from a variety of sources, including social media and search, and they go to the company home page or a dedicated landing page. The top of funnel (TOFU) offers like webinars and ebooks include a call-to-action which connects to a lead form. In this graphic, these leads leave the marketing realm and move into the sales funnel. Middle of the funnel (MOFU) offers can now happen on the way to purchase. After purchase, you can calculate the return on investment (ROI) using the total lifetime value of the customer (TTLV) and the cost of customer acquisition (COCA).

Thanks to Aarne for creating this graphic representation of the B2B social media lead generation process.

The B2B Social Media Book as a Social Network

Now that the Kindle version of The B2B Social Media Book has been out for about six weeks, we’ve noticed something interesting. One feature of the Kindle is that highlighted passages not only show up in everyone’s version of the electronic version, but the most popular ones show on the Amazon website. This tells us (as authors of the book) which ideas most resonate with readers. But it also tells readers which ideas were noted by other readers.

This builds some social proof for the ideas (“I can like this passage because others did”), but it also starts a community, or social network, around the Kindle readers of the book. It’s almost like a secret society where people leave messages for each other in the book. While you are reading along, you might pause a little longer on a highlighted passage because someone else thought it was important. In the past you might have checked a book out of the library and it had some notes in it, but that didn’t build any real connections. As more people read the Kindle version, and annotate their copy by highlighting passages and ideas, the collective version of what’s important grows. This is a very interesting development in group book reading.

Below are the 10 most highlighted passages from the The B2B Social Media Book. They are all from early chapters, which makes sense this early in the release of the book. However, the first part of the book is the setup for the later tactic sections, so we expect that even long term earlier chapters will be over-represented in this list. And just for fun, since this book does have two authors, we do get a bit competitive about whose chapters have more highlighted passages.

1. Highlighted by 18 Kindle users
Does your offer:
1. Solve a problem for the prospect?
2. Align with the product or service of the business?
3. Provide unique information not easily found in other online resources?
(Chapter 2: Five-Step Social Media Lead Generation Process)

2. Highlighted by 14 Kindle users
For a B2B company to have successful search engine marketing in 2012 and beyond, it must leverage social media.
(Chapter 3: Yes, Chapter 3 in a Social Media Book Is about Search )

3. Highlighted by 13 Kindle users
Prospects don’t want to hear about your products. They want solutions to their problems.
(Chapter 2: Five-Step Social Media Lead Generation Process)

4. Highlighted by 12 Kindle users
Need for Generating Higher Revenue with Lower Marketing Budgets
(Chapter 1: Why B2B Is Better At Social Media Than B2C)

5. Highlighted by 10 Kindle users
Maximizing content discovery can be done by producing awesome content and reducing fiction around sharing that content.
(Chapter 2: Five-Step Social Media Lead Generation Process)

6. Highlighted by 10 Kindle users
Instead, it is one piece of a well-planned and executed inbound marketing strategy that is tightly aligned to business objectives.
(Chapter 1: Why B2B Is Better At Social Media Than B2C)

7. Highlighted by 10 Kindle users
B2B companies are better suited for social media marketing than B2C companies.
(Chapter 1: Why B2B Is Better At Social Media Than B2C)

8. Highlighted by 10 Kindle users
Reducing approvals and empowering marketing to ship online content is the single biggest lever you can pull to increase lead generation.
(Chapter 2: Five-Step Social Media Lead Generation Process)

9. Highlighted by 7 Kindle users
Generating leads using social media starts with three core elements that are the linchpin for the entire online lead generation process: offers, calls to action (CTAs), and landing page.
(Chapter 2: Five-Step Social Media Lead Generation Process)

10. Highlighted by 8 Kindle users
A lead is someone who raises his or her hand—a person who demonstrates interest in something that a business has to offer.
(Chapter 2: Five-Step Social Media Lead Generation Process)

Do you have the Kindle version of The B2B Social Media Book, and have you highlighted any passages? Have you ever highlighted anything in a Kindle book?